Random witterings

geardrops:

tony-and-loki:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

cheskamouse:

craftastrophies:

edgebug:

Iron Man (2008): Deleted Scenes

Tony Comes Home

christ.

can you imagine though, jarvis all alone in tony’s malibu house? jarvis who of course doesn’t have any physical form at all, jarvis who at this point occupies just the house and tony’s phone—jarvis, who is dependent on tony for everything, who lives essentially in tony’s pocket, suddenly being completely alone for the first time in his silicon life.

and every ten minutes on the dot for days and days and days he accesses the latest news reports, re-calculating and re-calculating tony’s chances at survival, endlessly running the numbers. and nobody told him to do that. tony’s house was empty and dark and nobody told jarvis to keep an eye on the news but he did. jarvis could have just spun down his hard drives and gone into hibernate mode, but he didn’t.

no, he watched the news. he stood vigil. he waited and he hoped that his calculations were wrong. that one day he would be able to say welcome home, sir once more.

Emotional state: upset about robots.

Well yea, kids get upset when their parent isn’t around.

I HAVE SO MANY JARVIS FEELS RIGHT NOW

did you just get me upset over automated intelligence?

I’m not at all surprised that I was made upset about robots.

(Source: soirresponsible)

prostheticknowledge:

36 ventilators whirl 4.7m3 of packing chips

Latest installation from Zimoun uses simple materials to display turbulance - video embedded below:

From Creative Applications:

Opening this Saturday (April 26) at the Art Museum of Lugano in Switzerland, 36 ventilators, 4.7m³ packing chips is the new installation by Zimoun, the Bern-based artist known for his architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Zimoun yet again extends his installation inventory. Converting nine of the museum’s towering window spaces into ‘ventilation chambers’ (four ventilators are installed in each window) and filling them with polystyrene, Zimoun unleashes a perfect ‘plastic storm.’ Congregating into a mass that’s neither solid, gaseous nor liquid, the flakes perform a violent, otherworldy dance. With the phenonema trapped behind glass, we get to watch in wonder from the safety of the outside.

More at Creative Applications here
Zimoun is also featured in Creative Application’s new magazine HOLO, which you can find out more here

(via laughterkey)

wheres-margo:

I hope this is readable (if it’s not I’ll reupload). I got handed this by a policeman outside of a tube station the other week and I think it’s an important bit of information that should be shared, especially as this blog reaches a lot of people in London who will use public transport

wheres-margo:

I hope this is readable (if it’s not I’ll reupload). I got handed this by a policeman outside of a tube station the other week and I think it’s an important bit of information that should be shared, especially as this blog reaches a lot of people in London who will use public transport

(via gideonhallett)

Inside the moody, introspective world of cult Captain America webcomic 'American Captain'.

hellotailor:

Created by comics artist Robyn Kenealy, American Captain a uniquely downbeat take on Steve Rogers, the alter ego of Marvel’s Captain America.

On a superficial level, Captain America is a classic square-jawed superhero, a staunchly moral and patriotic wartime icon who slowly evolved into the Hollywoodized Chris Evans character we know from movies like The Avengers.

Frozen and then reawoken in the present day, in many ways Steve Rogers is one of the most tragic superheroes around: a man trying to find his way in an alien environment, where all his friends are dead or dying of old age. American Captain borrows the diary comic style of indie artists like Robert Crumb and Alison Bechdel to explore how he deals (or doesn’t deal) with adjusting to life in the 21st century.

What made you decide to go this route with Captain America, of all characters? American Captain explores some pretty dark and downbeat topics that most people wouldn’t really associate with a hero that’s often perceived as being very wholesome.

Robyn Kenealey: Honestly I have some skeptical looks for anybody who thinks it’s normal to want to be a superhero. I don’t think it’s normal. I don’t think it’s normal to start fights with people in alleys (defending yourself is one thing. Actively starting fights? You may have some anger issues, son). I don’t think it’s normal to actively let the military put weird stuff in your body. Also, I’m not a fan of the historical consistency with which the military scoops up young men from shitty socio-economic situations and sends them to war.

The other thing I think a lot about in writing Steve’s character is that he’s a baby. He is (given the birthdate in the comics, not the movies), what, 23 when he’s frozen? He’s so, so young to be in the situation that he is. And that’s not unusual, but it is important, because it is so often invisible. So, so often, when you watch movies about WWII, something like Saving Private Ryan or Band of Brothers, or the Cap movies, in that Chris Evans is like 32 or something, you see actors who look like fully grown adults playing all of these these roles that in real life would have been staffed by very young men.

[READ MORE]

(via laughterkey)